For you rear brake haters. - Page 2 - ZX6R Forum
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post #16 of 43 Old 01-03-2017, 08:10 PM
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Hmmm, what's this funny looking lever this guy keeps pushing on?

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Aren't you supposed to use both brakes?
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post #17 of 43 Old 01-03-2017, 11:39 PM
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Aren't you supposed to use both brakes?
Only if u wanna look cool and crash
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post #18 of 43 Old 01-04-2017, 09:58 AM
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post #19 of 43 Old 01-04-2017, 12:07 PM
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Chassis Geometry 101, and why using the rear brake on the racetrack can be ok.

Before anyone goes and decides to stomp on their rear brake at the track.

On the street: go to town. Use your rear brake as much as you like. On the track, for the vast majority of riders it can cause more problems than it solves.
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post #20 of 43 Old 01-04-2017, 03:44 PM
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That's fine and dandy for MotoGP racers and even amateur racers. I understand the logic that it helps set the rear for the turn and all that or to even slide the bike into the corner. But I still maintain that using the rear break is an advanced rider skill that may get the majority of riders that don't race into trouble. Even if you develop very good skill in utilizing the rear brake during aggressive riding, in an emergency situation, riders will revert back to what they practice which includes going for the rear brake and likely jamming it and locking the rear wheel and initiating a lowside or highside (Guilty as charged here.) Staying on the bike as long as possible gives you the best braking distance. And study after study has shown the rear brake only contributes to a mere fraction of stopping distance. Put that against the ability of the average rider to effectively use the rear brake in an emergency situation, I don't think its worth it, and I recommend to my fellow amateur riders to not use their rear brake and instead focus on progressive front braking. Your mind can much easier focus on progressing force onto one lever (the front brake) rather than two different levers (front and rear brake), therefore you can more easily prevent brake lockup.

As the recent "study" done by Virginia Tech highlights, the average rider is still underwhemingly skilled in braking and there is a huge amount of riders that are plowing into the back of vehicles. And I believe through my own experience that this is because they are not adequately skilled in braking, and if they do get on the rear brake, they lock the rear and purposely initiate a low side like we've all seen tons of our friends do. Which is extremely counterproductive because they would've been traveling slower at the time of collision or even completely avoid collision if they stayed on the bike as long as possible. Once you leave that bike, you trade the superior mechanical stopping power for just relying on friction to slow you down.

Just my $.02 As with anything, we all have differing opinions on these types of topics. If your confident enough for it, go for it. You're certainly a better rider than I am.

I am an avid self-confessed rear brake user. Am I a better rider than those discribed in the VA Tech study? Oh hell yes. Is this hubris at work? No, not really. I've been riding for almost 30+ years, raced for 15 of those years, and taught MSF for 10 years.

I am not a 'naturally gifted track god,' what I have done is invested in an education. None of it came cheap nor easy. I demand saddle time from myself... I still do. I invest in making over my bike into my image, and not the other way around. Thus, the combined efforts from both rider & bike are exponentially greater.

Whenever I had street riders in my MSF courses who were reluctant to use the rear brake, they'd all tell me they could stop in the same distance & in an equally controlled manner, I would challenge that perception: We ran drills with rear brake only, front brake only, and both brakes and mark off their distance in each case. You should remember your engine is not the most powerful component on your bike... The brakes are. You say 'Bull shit'! I say truth. Measurements of 100-0, 60-0 will ALWAYS be shorter distances than 0-60, 0-100.

The combined f/r braking distance was consistently 20%-30% shorter. These self professed race/riding gods would always say things like, "... Well, roughly 25% isn't all that much, what's the big deal... ?" My answer was: "... Let's put it this way, you're cruising at 60mph on a road you know well. You peak around the first corner of a double apex corner. The road looks clear, you spool up the throttle just a wee bit to get a good drive out of the last of the complex, 'cuz there's a nice little straight prior to the next curve. But as you are banked over exiting the 2nd corner you realize there's produce truck stopped because their load shifted. Are you gonna brake with both brakes and come up 6-ft short from their steel bumper, or are you gonna use just the front and plough 6-ft into the back end of the truck, sustaining life terminating internal injuries?

You say that's all bull shit, I say I have gone over the fatal stats in my state, and for the rest of the Western states and say, 'no, tragically that's how real life ends.'

You don't wanna become a statistical itemized widget in someone else's study, then you have the obligation to become a vastly improved rider. Do it to give your wife/girl friend/mother sound sleep. Explain to riding commrads why you are a smoother/faster/better rider than they remember. Encourage them to become better/safer riders... And maybe save their lives.
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post #21 of 43 Old 01-04-2017, 03:59 PM
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I am an avid self-confessed rear brake user. Am I a better rider than those discribed in the VA Tech study? Oh hell yes. Is this hubris at work? No, not really. I've been riding for almost 30+ years, raced for 15 of those years, and taught MSF for 10 years.

I am not a 'naturally gifted track god,' what I have done is invested in an education. None of it came cheap nor easy. I demand saddle time from myself... I still do. I invest in making over my bike into my image, and not the other way around. Thus, the combined efforts from both rider & bike are exponentially greater.

Whenever I had street riders in my MSF courses who were reluctant to use the rear brake, they'd all tell me they could stop in the same distance & in an equally controlled manner, I would challenge that perception: We ran drills with rear brake only, front brake only, and both brakes and mark off their distance in each case. You should remember your engine is not the most powerful component on your bike... The brakes are. You say 'Bullet' shit! I say truth. Measurements of 100-0, 60-0 will ALWAYS be shorter distances than 0-60, 0-100.

The combined f/r braking distance was consistently 20%-30% shorter. These self professed race/riding gods would always say things like, "... Well, roughly 25% isn't all that much, what's the big deal... ?" My answer was: "... Let's put it this way, you're cruising at 60mph on a road you know well. You peak around the first corner of a double apex corner. The road looks clear, you spool up the throttle just a wee bit to get a good drive out of the last of the complex, 'cuz there's a nice little straight prior to the next curve. But as you are banked over exiting the 2nd corner you realize there's produce truck stopped because their load shifted. Are you gonna brake with both brakes and come up 6-ft short from their steel bumper, or are you gonna use just the front and plough 6-ft into the back end of the truck, sustaining life terminating internal injuries?

You say that's all bull shit, I say I have gone over the fatal stats in my state, and for the rest of the Western states and say, 'no, tragically that's how real life ends.'

You don't wanna become a statistical itemized widget in someone else's study, then you have the obligation to become a vastly improved rider. Do it to give your wife/girl friend/mother sound sleep. Explain to riding commrads why you are a smoother/faster/better rider than they remember. Encourage them to become better/safer riders... And maybe save their lives.
All of this is true, and from a scientific point of view too (regarding the braking distances)!

Also, it seems like with every other post you make, I expand my vocabulary. I had to google "hubris"

And yes, unfortunately education is greatly overlooked by many riders. A lot of people think that if they haven't fallen off the bike yet, they're outstanding riders, and if they do crash it's someone else's fault no matter what. There are too many people that spend way more money on exhausts and LED lights and chromed wheels than on bettering themselves as riders.
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post #22 of 43 Old 01-04-2017, 04:28 PM
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Originally Posted by ZedExMuse View Post
I am an avid self-confessed rear brake user. Am I a better rider than those discribed in the VA Tech study? Oh hell yes. Is this hubris at work? No, not really. I've been riding for almost 30+ years, raced for 15 of those years, and taught MSF for 10 years.

I am not a 'naturally gifted track god,' what I have done is invested in an education. None of it came cheap nor easy. I demand saddle time from myself... I still do. I invest in making over my bike into my image, and not the other way around. Thus, the combined efforts from both rider & bike are exponentially greater.

Whenever I had street riders in my MSF courses who were reluctant to use the rear brake, they'd all tell me they could stop in the same distance & in an equally controlled manner, I would challenge that perception: We ran drills with rear brake only, front brake only, and both brakes and mark off their distance in each case. You should remember your engine is not the most powerful component on your bike... The brakes are. You say 'Bullet' shit! I say truth. Measurements of 100-0, 60-0 will ALWAYS be shorter distances than 0-60, 0-100.

The combined f/r braking distance was consistently 20%-30% shorter. These self professed race/riding gods would always say things like, "... Well, roughly 25% isn't all that much, what's the big deal... ?" My answer was: "... Let's put it this way, you're cruising at 60mph on a road you know well. You peak around the first corner of a double apex corner. The road looks clear, you spool up the throttle just a wee bit to get a good drive out of the last of the complex, 'cuz there's a nice little straight prior to the next curve. But as you are banked over exiting the 2nd corner you realize there's produce truck stopped because their load shifted. Are you gonna brake with both brakes and come up 6-ft short from their steel bumper, or are you gonna use just the front and plough 6-ft into the back end of the truck, sustaining life terminating internal injuries?

You say that's all bull shit, I say I have gone over the fatal stats in my state, and for the rest of the Western states and say, 'no, tragically that's how real life ends.'

You don't wanna become a statistical itemized widget in someone else's study, then you have the obligation to become a vastly improved rider. Do it to give your wife/girl friend/mother sound sleep. Explain to riding commrads why you are a smoother/faster/better rider than they remember. Encourage them to become better/safer riders... And maybe save their lives.
Everything else is completely true! I doubt the average rider can pull over anything better than 25 % better stopping distance, but other than that I am completely in agreement of what you said.

HOWEVER

I try to argue practicality. Taking the average rider, and expecting him to be able to apply progressive even pressure to two different levers that apply force at two different pressures and rates in the face of serious injury or even death in an emergency is not practical, is not practical, in my opinion

If we could take the average riders and somehow measure them again in your 60-0 or even 100-0 example in an emergency surprise situation, I guarantee the stopping distances would be worse for all riders and that 20-30 % would be a lot less, and a huge portion of them, will end up doing what ourselves or a lot of our friends do. Panic brake, lock the rear up, freak out with the sliding of the rear tire, and either bail off the bike or highside. Once you come off that bike, your stopping distance will drastically increase as then you only have air resistance and or friction to slow you down.

So once again, in the argument of practicality, I don't believe riders that don't sufficiently train for it, should be using their rear brake.
I wholeheartedly agree with you, you SHOULD become a better braker and you should train to where you can use the rear brake. But even on that end, you have to have some true confidence. I did, and at the track in a close call, I ended up with a rear brake induced high side instead of what likely would've been a near miss with just front braking.

Didn't come in here to start an argument, I just felt OP was directed to people like here's a MotoGP rider, be like him even though what he's doing, 99 % of all motorcycle riders will never get to that skill level.

And I like those words of wisdom about the brakes. That was a cool way to point out how great brakes are! I'm sure I'll be quoting you!

ALSO......ABS completely changes this! And in the hopes that it comes standard on all bikes someday, riders with ABS should be using their rear brakes! I would still recommend applying front brake first, but ABS is certainly a game changer in this debate.
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post #23 of 43 Old 01-05-2017, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by RedAndBlack View Post
Everything else is completely true! I doubt the average rider can pull over anything better than 25 % better stopping distance, but other than that I am completely in agreement of what you said.

HOWEVER

I try to argue practicality. Taking the average rider, and expecting him to be able to apply progressive even pressure to two different levers that apply force at two different pressures and rates in the face of serious injury or even death in an emergency is not practical, is not practical, in my opinion

If we could take the average riders and somehow measure them again in your 60-0 or even 100-0 example in an emergency surprise situation, I guarantee the stopping distances would be worse for all riders and that 20-30 % would be a lot less, and a huge portion of them, will end up doing what ourselves or a lot of our friends do. Panic brake, lock the rear up, freak out with the sliding of the rear tire, and either bail off the bike or highside. Once you come off that bike, your stopping distance will drastically increase as then you only have air resistance and or friction to slow you down.

So once again, in the argument of practicality, I don't believe riders that don't sufficiently train for it, should be using their rear brake.
I wholeheartedly agree with you, you SHOULD become a better braker and you should train to where you can use the rear brake. But even on that end, you have to have some true confidence. I did, and at the track in a close call, I ended up with a rear brake induced high side instead of what likely would've been a near miss with just front braking.

Didn't come in here to start an argument, I just felt OP was directed to people like here's a MotoGP rider, be like him even though what he's doing, 99 % of all motorcycle riders will never get to that skill level.

And I like those words of wisdom about the brakes. That was a cool way to point out how great brakes are! I'm sure I'll be quoting you!

ALSO......ABS completely changes this! And in the hopes that it comes standard on all bikes someday, riders with ABS should be using their rear brakes! I would still recommend applying front brake first, but ABS is certainly a game changer in this debate.

R&B, I mean you no disrespect... but I do expect my fellow rider to acquire and utilise skills, such as advanced braking, to save their ass." I do expect these same said riders to over come their panic; you and I can do nothing for them, they must seek and acquire the inner calm to proceed in a safe & controlled fashion. This is only discovered b"Trial by Fire" - you just have to learn to over come the panic, and use that very energy to focus one's attention of the critical issue(s) at hand. There is no 'red or blue pill.' All of us 'older riders know this as The Pace. If you are unfamiliar with this literary article, Google it.

But with that said, your arguments are impassioned, but you argue the case for the banal sheep-like mentality of "average", for Heaven's sake man, aspire to be greater than average. Do not make excuses for the dim lazy-minded riders of the world. I say this to you as your-brother-in-arms in this ZX-family; we have beheld too many inglorious deaths of predominately young, male riders. I will be blunt: do not defend the self- imposed ignorant people of the world, be they ZX-Riders or otherwise.

Would you expect to go SCUBA diving without being PADI certified (or other sanctioning bodies) prior to going for a deep/open water dive? Would you not invest in top-rated regulators, other gear prior to dipping into the ocean?

Would you jump out of a perfectly good aeroplane without a parachute, and prior instruction?

News flash: strapping on ATGATT prior to sitting on what amounts to a land-based missile requires commitment & training. I am not talking ignorant "crotch-rocket" jargon, I am speaking about applied physics. The same would apply for a H-D, too. I task myself to seek, obtain, and continue my quest for continuing education where it applies to riding a motorcycle at elevated speeds over challenging physical features. I don't expect someone else to do it for me. It is my responsibility! This I do for my loved ones. I have a moral & ethical obligation to my wife and son to come home from every ride, every track-day, every long distance journey, and having brought on to myself, thus, by extension to them, no harm to my body (ego excepted), nor to my bike; and also acquisition of civil penalties which would affect to the 'family budget.'

R&B, please be an example of what a skilled an d talented rider is. Throw a road block to the status quo. Proclaim you are better than the insipid masses, that you matter... to yourself... to your loved ones, that you have no obligation to follow blindly into their hoof prints.

Better braking techniques matter more than better standing start techniques... in the long run. I am not a "stunter" by any means, but that doesn't mean I don't do the occasional "stoppie." To be honest, I practice this whilst purposely late-braking into a corner on the track... This is how one 'out brakes' another rider for a pass during an 'A-group' track-day. Do not for a moment think this skill will be required on the road. It most certainly will be.

Be well; ride safe.
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post #24 of 43 Old 01-05-2017, 08:00 PM
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All of this is true, and from a scientific point of view too (regarding the braking distances)!

Also, it seems like with every other post you make, I expand my vocabulary. I had to google "hubris"

And yes, unfortunately education is greatly overlooked by many riders. A lot of people think that if they haven't fallen off the bike yet, they're outstanding riders, and if they do crash it's someone else's fault no matter what. There are too many people that spend way more money on exhausts and LED lights and chromed wheels than on bettering themselves as riders.

Glad to offer 'continuing education'

You are all too correct about predominantly new riders getting side tracked like a crow with 'bright shiney' things. I admit to bling-ing my ride. But there's a greater plan in play. My primary intent is aimed more towards 'what works' for track days; and/or long distance journeys.

Regarding not haven fallen... that's merely a statistical anomaly, a.k.a. luck. Sooner or later the mean old luck runs out. What's usually associated with these situations is the neophyte thinks they are 'immune' to falling and *hubris catches up with them.

(*Just for you SBK.)
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post #25 of 43 Old 01-05-2017, 08:39 PM
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Glad to offer 'continuing education'

You are all too correct about predominantly new riders getting side tracked like a crow with 'bright shiney' things. I admit to bling-ing my ride. But there's a greater plan in play. My primary intent is aimed more towards 'what works' for track days; and/or long distance journeys.

Regarding not haven fallen... that's merely a statistical anomaly, a.k.a. luck. Sooner or later the mean old luck runs out. What's usually associated with these situations is the neophyte thinks they are 'immune' to falling and *hubris catches up with them.

(*Just for you SBK.)
Yep, exactly. And I have nothing against blinging out a bike. I like carbon fiber and cool looking parts as much as anyone else, but the thing I don't like is when someone that's fairly new to motorcycles has a choice to make between spending money on more training and improving skills, and buying parts that just look cool but won't really help them in any way, and they choose the latter. With my first bike, I was a total noob, didn't know much about bikes then. I didn't buy any aftermarket parts, I just bought a new rear tire, changed the oil and rode the bike as much as I could while I had it. On my second bike, I went to the track shortly after I got it and it really opened my eyes. It was a humbling experience and I knew that my money would be better spent on more training, so that's what I did, along with a leather suit, boots, and better gloves. It was only after about 6 months that I got an exhaust, and then another 6 months when I started getting more aftermarket parts...cuz I had crashed it, so it was a good time to do that
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post #26 of 43 Old 01-06-2017, 12:23 PM
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Yep, exactly. And I have nothing against blinging out a bike. I like carbon fiber and cool looking parts as much as anyone else, but the thing I don't like is when someone that's fairly new to motorcycles has a choice to make between spending money on more training and improving skills, and buying parts that just look cool but won't really help them in any way, and they choose the latter. With my first bike, I was a total noob, didn't know much about bikes then. I didn't buy any aftermarket parts, I just bought a new rear tire, changed the oil and rode the bike as much as I could while I had it. On my second bike, I went to the track shortly after I got it and it really opened my eyes. It was a humbling experience and I knew that my money would be better spent on more training, so that's what I did, along with a leather suit, boots, and better gloves. It was only after about 6 months that I got an exhaust, and then another 6 months when I started getting more aftermarket parts...cuz I had crashed it, so it was a good time to do that

Listen up Young Guns, SBK knows of what he 'speaks,' and speaks wisely. Many of us, probably most of us have had similar experiences, I know I have. So, put most of your funds into track days. I'm not trying to pee on anyone's parade. You, the rider are the weakest link in the process.

'Noobs' do not think that me & SBK and other like us are just a bunch of grizzled apostolic curmudgeons, we are, but we offer advice because & in spite of our shared experiences - the Hard Knock variety.

If it is a 'money thing' stop fooling yourself. You have money for that shorty M4 slip-on, and daily lattes... and that Mucho-Grande Beefy/Bean Burrito five times a week, etc. You can scrape up some green.

Or, you can copy something I have set-up: I call it my ABC file on my computer that my wife can access. ABC stands for Anniversary, Birthday, & Christmas. In this file I have compiled a hodge-podge of... as one of my riding buddies puts it: moto-porn. Clever, I know. but when there's something in moto-dom that I... covet... I copy the URL of what, where it can be obtained. Included of coarse, are pertinent info, such as colour,size, pt #, etc.

So, back to the ABC file, when friends & relatives ask what they can get me for each of those occasions they contribute whatever amount and just write a check or even PayPal. I have found people are more than willing to do this instead of trudging off to the store, etc. By the way parents, we have the same arrangement for a 529-college fund for our son. We find most people are actually more generous with this arrangement!

The ABC also contains nine regional tracks from Thunderhill in the south The Ridge & Pacific Raceways in the north. And I occasionally will go to Laguna Seca, and even Sears Point Sonoma Raceway. Now in the spirit of full disclosure, I have to admit that I have two brother-in-laws who live within 20-miles each of the former two tracks. And I have a dear friend who lives south of Santa Cruz, CA which makes it quite doable for L.S.

I do not do Disneyland. I do P.I.R., Oregon Raceway Park, etc. Sometimes I even do this when the wife is taking the son to Six Flags, etc. Yeah! Then I'll go to Sears Point/Infineon/Sonoma Raceway - It will always be Sears Point to this old codger. The wife has an aunt living in Sacramento... which makes it a long-ish doable experience it's, an hour & a quarter each way (< 70-mi).

Not everyone is that fortuitous, but when you start doing these track days you'll start making new acquaintances who will live close to yet another track and so on. They'll let you crash on their couch and feed you breakfast & dinner. Trust me, it is more doable than you think.


There, I'm done. Do it people! Don't become fodder for the cagers, your own inexperience, over zealousness, dare I say... stupidity. Be informed, hone your tools, use every technique that is appropriate for any occasion.
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post #27 of 43 Old 01-08-2017, 06:17 AM
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Street riding: I don't touch the rear brake anymore under heaving front braking. The rear simply gets too light and easy to lock up, it's a very fine line. I doubt very few can or are willing to test the limits to master the rear for a marginal gain in braking distance. Under a smooth predictable front loading, I'll use the rear.

My beemer has the front and rear brakes linked to actutate whenever the front brake is used but it has ABS to prevent rear lock ups.
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post #28 of 43 Old 01-20-2017, 08:25 PM
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R&B, I mean you no disrespect... but I do expect my fellow rider to acquire and utilise skills, such as advanced braking, to save their ass." I do expect these same said riders to over come their panic; you and I can do nothing for them, they must seek and acquire the inner calm to proceed in a safe & controlled fashion. This is only discovered b"Trial by Fire" - you just have to learn to over come the panic, and use that very energy to focus one's attention of the critical issue(s) at hand. There is no 'red or blue pill.' All of us 'older riders know this as The Pace. If you are unfamiliar with this literary article, Google it.

But with that said, your arguments are impassioned, but you argue the case for the banal sheep-like mentality of "average", for Heaven's sake man, aspire to be greater than average. Do not make excuses for the dim lazy-minded riders of the world. I say this to you as your-brother-in-arms in this ZX-family; we have beheld too many inglorious deaths of predominately young, male riders. I will be blunt: do not defend the self- imposed ignorant people of the world, be they ZX-Riders or otherwise.

Would you expect to go SCUBA diving without being PADI certified (or other sanctioning bodies) prior to going for a deep/open water dive? Would you not invest in top-rated regulators, other gear prior to dipping into the ocean?

Would you jump out of a perfectly good aeroplane without a parachute, and prior instruction?

News flash: strapping on ATGATT prior to sitting on what amounts to a land-based missile requires commitment & training. I am not talking ignorant "crotch-rocket" jargon, I am speaking about applied physics. The same would apply for a H-D, too. I task myself to seek, obtain, and continue my quest for continuing education where it applies to riding a motorcycle at elevated speeds over challenging physical features. I don't expect someone else to do it for me. It is my responsibility! This I do for my loved ones. I have a moral & ethical obligation to my wife and son to come home from every ride, every track-day, every long distance journey, and having brought on to myself, thus, by extension to them, no harm to my body (ego excepted), nor to my bike; and also acquisition of civil penalties which would affect to the 'family budget.'

R&B, please be an example of what a skilled an d talented rider is. Throw a road block to the status quo. Proclaim you are better than the insipid masses, that you matter... to yourself... to your loved ones, that you have no obligation to follow blindly into their hoof prints.

Better braking techniques matter more than better standing start techniques... in the long run. I am not a "stunter" by any means, but that doesn't mean I don't do the occasional "stoppie." To be honest, I practice this whilst purposely late-braking into a corner on the track... This is how one 'out brakes' another rider for a pass during an 'A-group' track-day. Do not for a moment think this skill will be required on the road. It most certainly will be.

Be well; ride safe.
Listen...You don't have to tell me. I'm out dragging knee, riding track and all that bullshit and I still take the time to hit the parking lot a few times a year just to practice emergency braking. Nothing else but stopping as fast as I can without ABS kicking in. I understand the consequences of it, I don't feel the need or reasons to try to one up or explain why.

My original post was to just critisize the mentality I felt the OP was putting down, which was basically, these guys do it. We all should.

No. Those are MotoGP riders. They are a very elite example of what to do on a bike. 95 % of riders out there are incapable of riding at 50 % of their skill.

We all have their opinions. I take a practical approach on my fellow rider. That isn't the same approach I take.
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post #29 of 43 Old 01-21-2017, 11:35 PM
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Ken Hill Podcast, What's the Real Story on the Rear Brake?: https://soundcloud.com/ken-hill-5347...the-rear-brake

Martillo y Mantequilla #99
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post #30 of 43 Old 04-27-2017, 09:35 PM
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Some more insight into rear brake use relating to different riding/motorcycle styles from JL99 (SportRider interview 04/26/17):

"With the Yamaha, what you have to do is slow down a bit in the beginning, because the bike doesn’t allow you to brake neither very aggressively nor very late, and get off the brakes early and open the gas early. With the Ducati, it’s exactly the opposite: I have to be very aware that I have to brake later, more forcefully, to generate more weight transfer. On the other hand, I have to use the rear brake, which with the Yamaha I never used; Braking the motorcycle by sliding the rear wheel. That’s the opposite of the Yamaha."

Additionally,

"The bike right now just does not stop when you pull the brakes. That's why Ducati riders use the rear brake much, so that this inertia that the bike has does not tire your arms so much, because it requires a lot of arm strength. Then the engine is very nervous, especially at high speed. In fact, you also have to use a little rear brake to calm the bike down in some corners. In those two phases, under braking and under acceleration at high speed, the bike is more physical. Instead, on the straights is a bike much more stable, it moves less, there you can relax a little ... But yes, in general, it tires you out more, and riding it makes your pulse beat faster."

And on comparing Vinales on the Yamaha to his former riding there:

"With the Bridgestones, the truth is that I reached a very high level, but with the Michelin it was very inconsistent. It depended on the tires they gave me and the track conditions; I didn’t get to be as regular as with the Bridgestone. Viñales instead is consistent at all the circuits and it’s because he knows how to use the rear brake. I didn’t use it with the Yamaha, it wasn’t as necessary as it is with the Ducati, for example, but Viñales does, and that helps him not to weight the front so much. Braking only with the front is very effective, and in water, for example, this is very good because you brake with both wheels. I wish I had understood this trick and applied it on the Yamaha, because I could have slowed down later and I wouldn’t have always had that handicap under braking. Surely last year I lost because of that."

Martillo y Mantequilla #99

Last edited by jd41; 04-27-2017 at 09:44 PM. Reason: article updated
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