Planning. - Page 2 - ZX6R Forum
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post #16 of 26 Old 04-04-2017, 09:47 PM
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It's the same thing with gun safety...... you discover very, very quickly who you feel comfortable with, and it is obvious when there is a lack of discipline. It was drilled in at a very early age...... always treat a gun as if it is loaded, and never, ever point one at someone you don't intend to shoot.

I'd rather not go shooting, if there are any shenanigans going on. The opportunity for disaster is too great......

Funny, when I has 15, my dad was about to give me a driving lesson - I grew up on a ranch, I was driving tractor at 8, and a farm pick-up at 12. Anyway, he was pontificating about responsible driving, with a car like mine - a '68 Chevelle SS, with the big-block 396 c.i.d. I was rolling my eyes and just acting like a "know it all" 15-yr old. He said, "Wait a minute​ pal," he went into the house and came back with my .270 hunting rifle. And loaded a bullet in it and laid it across the hood of my car - without the safety on, and said "... This car is like this rifle. Both can sit here for a 100-yrs, and never harm a soul. Guns don't kill people, people kill people. And your car is no different." I think the same can be the same of super fast high performance motorbikes.
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post #17 of 26 Old 04-05-2017, 06:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RJ2112 View Post
It's the same thing with gun safety...... you discover very, very quickly who you feel comfortable with, and it is obvious when there is a lack of discipline. It was drilled in at a very early age...... always treat a gun as if it is loaded, and never, ever point one at someone you don't intend to shoot.

I'd rather not go shooting, if there are any shenanigans going on. The opportunity for disaster is too great......
Amen! I went to the range with a group from my department at work once. I will NEVER go back to the range with old boss. He pointed his pistol my direction and other's multiple times while "fiddling" with it. I was in the uncomfortable position of having to call my boss out for that behavior. I did it though, because he was a danger to those around him. I would never have guessed he would be so cavalier with a firearm.

I was also at a friend's deer camp once and encountered drunk hunters who were camp members. I went back to camp, loaded up and went home.
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post #18 of 26 Old 04-05-2017, 09:16 AM Thread Starter
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Amen! I went to the range with a group from my department at work once. I will NEVER go back to the range with old boss. He pointed his pistol my direction and other's multiple times while "fiddling" with it. I was in the uncomfortable position of having to call my boss out for that behavior. I did it though, because he was a danger to those around him. I would never have guessed he would be so cavalier with a firearm.

I was also at a friend's deer camp once and encountered drunk hunters who were camp members. I went back to camp, loaded up and went home.
I've explained somewhat tactfully to a former coworker that I wasn't appreciative of their use of an LED laser pointer, when they intentionally hit me in the eyes with it....... their understanding of that device becoming a suppository, should it happen again, solved the issue.
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"Basic stuff fellas. Use your head for something other than to break your next fall."

"There's this adage that we have 2 ears and one mouth so we should listen twice as much as we talk. Unfortunately with the Internet people have taken this old adage and turned it around. They have two eyes and 10 fingers so they think they need to post 5 times as much as they read. And since they have 10 fingers and one brain, they only have to think 10% of the time! "
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post #19 of 26 Old 04-05-2017, 10:47 AM
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I usually prefer to ride alone, or with one or two trusted others. How do I know I can trust their skills?

- They don't paddle like a lunatic with their feet when either starting or stopping
- They have solid clutch control. How many idiots do you see yanking in the clutch and coasting around corners, etc?
- They *gasp* actually alter their body position appropriately rather than sit like a sack of mud in the same position.
- They dominate their lane position on straight roads rather than ride close to the curb and risk some idiot pushing their way past (and us into the bushes).
- They're always looking ahead to plan their lines and observe for hazards. They know to make adjustments for wet patches, leaves, potholes... even areas in deep shadow when it's blazing sunshine on a hot day.

There are other points too, but these are the main ones for me. Want to be INSANELY capable on the road*** (regardless of what you ride)? Get something like "Motorcycle Roadcraft: The Police Rider's Handbook" and actually put into practice what's in there. I've seen guys on litre bikes and all the Gucci gear frantically trying to escape two cops on ancient BMWs who weren't even breaking a sweat.


*** If it doesn't also make you faster on the track, I'll eat my helmet.

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The best advice I ever received was "Just look pretty and try not to break anything."

1999 ZX6R (G2) - Pipewerx exhaust (dB killer removed) | Dynojet Stage 1 | K&N air filter | flushmount front LED indicators | Clear LED tail light with integrated indicators | Scottoiler eSystem | Pyramid Plastics hugger | HID headlight | Stubby levers | HEL braided steel lines | 07 ZX6R radial master cylinder | Bar-end mirrors | Double-bubble screen | Crash bobbins | one hell of an anal-retentive owner.

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post #20 of 26 Old 04-05-2017, 11:05 AM
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Like it or not, when riding with foolish riders, if one of them goes down YOU BECOME THE FIRST RESPONDER. This sucks, even when the rider is a good rider. I have seen more motocross and street accidents that required immediate medical help. I advise all of you to take a first aid class, at least CPR. You never know what will happen on the open road.
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post #21 of 26 Old 04-05-2017, 11:47 AM Thread Starter
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Like it or not, when riding with foolish riders, if one of them goes down YOU BECOME THE FIRST RESPONDER. This sucks, even when the rider is a good rider. I have seen more motocross and street accidents that required immediate medical help. I advise all of you to take a first aid class, at least CPR. You never know what will happen on the open road.
The number of people who ride, who have no idea what sort of energy is involved in a crash is sad.....

When I worked as a Navy LEO in the later 1980s we would pull over dependent wives driving around on base with their toddlers standing on the seat, looking out the windows, etc..... it was always a courtesy stop, and the simple explanation given was that if you were to hit something at 25 MPH and come to a sudden stop -- your child will hit the dash just as hard as if you had thrown them out of a second story window.

The human body has just enough built in crash protection to preserve life, for the speeds that a human can propel themselves to without wheels. The best runners in the world are having a hard time hitting 15 MPH. (a four minute mile, is 15 MPH).... sprinters may hit as much as 20(?) but I doubt that anyone is going 30 without falling out of a tree or off a cliff.

Pretty much any crash in the canyons will involve speeds greater than 20 MPH. It's very nearly a given that significant injury will result. Hit something solid at 40 MPH -- that's a tough one to survive.

Fools rush in, where angels fear to tread....

"Basic stuff fellas. Use your head for something other than to break your next fall."

"There's this adage that we have 2 ears and one mouth so we should listen twice as much as we talk. Unfortunately with the Internet people have taken this old adage and turned it around. They have two eyes and 10 fingers so they think they need to post 5 times as much as they read. And since they have 10 fingers and one brain, they only have to think 10% of the time! "
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post #22 of 26 Old 04-05-2017, 12:14 PM Thread Starter
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Another aspect of planning your ride really comes down to where do you spend your time looking..... it can't be said often enough, or loud enough..... look where you want to go. Do not target fixate. The bike will go where you look.

The more strongly you ingrain that, the further 'ahead' of your present position you will find yourself operating.
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"Basic stuff fellas. Use your head for something other than to break your next fall."

"There's this adage that we have 2 ears and one mouth so we should listen twice as much as we talk. Unfortunately with the Internet people have taken this old adage and turned it around. They have two eyes and 10 fingers so they think they need to post 5 times as much as they read. And since they have 10 fingers and one brain, they only have to think 10% of the time! "
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post #23 of 26 Old 04-05-2017, 01:34 PM
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"Motorcycle Roadcraft: The Police Rider's Handbook"
Best book I've ever read on riding.

had a copy given to me by a police rider before I was made to go out with him on my 125 by my dad (who was a police rider too)

learned so much from that book
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post #24 of 26 Old 04-05-2017, 02:30 PM
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Back in my day... Damn, I feel old saying that, so I'll try again.

Over 20 years ago, when I was first doing my training for road riding, my instructor was a police blue ribbon instructor. This basically meant that he was an instructor who taught those who would be teaching police motorcycle roadcraft. There is no higher level than this as a road motorcyclist. When I'd passed, he told me to get a copy of this book, learn points from it and practice them. Up until that point, the only riding I'd really done was racing 250 2Ts and supermonos on track.

Not only did it make me so much smoother, faster and safer on the road, I actually improved my best times on the circuit by nearly 2 seconds. Considering that you can get a copy for £2 on Amazon? It's the smartest, cheapest and most effective upgrade ever.
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-------------------------------------------------------------

The best advice I ever received was "Just look pretty and try not to break anything."

1999 ZX6R (G2) - Pipewerx exhaust (dB killer removed) | Dynojet Stage 1 | K&N air filter | flushmount front LED indicators | Clear LED tail light with integrated indicators | Scottoiler eSystem | Pyramid Plastics hugger | HID headlight | Stubby levers | HEL braided steel lines | 07 ZX6R radial master cylinder | Bar-end mirrors | Double-bubble screen | Crash bobbins | one hell of an anal-retentive owner.
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post #25 of 26 Old 04-05-2017, 04:17 PM
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Quote:
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I vividly remember when I was living Corvallis, OR going to school, my house mates & I saw a fellow on an early Manx drop it at every traffic light - he as grossly intoxicated. I was nearly to tears - literally. It was sacrilegious for me. A horrible crime!
That poor cat...



It's one thing to drop a bike, but a cat...I would have reported him to the SPCA!
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A play on words, or words on play
Last chapter, verse in the final act
Words well scripted, each sentence choking
Inaudible gag, blanket which suffocates
As you eat another's words
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post #26 of 26 Old 04-05-2017, 04:24 PM
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In all seriousness, over here they have a system created by to train the police called the Institute of Advance Motorists (IAM) where you are constantly scanning, evaluating and making decisions. It's a good system and certainly covers what has been discussed in this thread. However the issue I have with most "systems" is that they are sometimes over-engineered. I think the most critical thing in your riding is to be aware, not too rigid in your thinking and be prepared to take on new thinking (as RJ2112 discussed). You need to be "humble". It's harder as you get older but well worth it. I've learned so much even from younger chaps who have a depth of experience I can only wish to attain.

A play on words, or words on play
Last chapter, verse in the final act
Words well scripted, each sentence choking
Inaudible gag, blanket which suffocates
As you eat another's words
Malnourished, you starve.
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